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Rise Up Rally
Saturday, April 11th, 2019
190 N. State St, Chicago, Il
12pm – 2pm

Why are drug dealers getting away with murder?

Grieving families across the U.S. & their supporters will #RISEUP in defense of the 197 lives lost a day following the unlawful delivery of a controlled substance resulting in a death.

Every suspected drug toxicity death warrants a criminal investigation. Participants will peacefully assemble passing out flyers related to the Drug Induced Homicide criminal statute, offer complimentary awareness bracelets and participants will share in the loss of their loved ones and the judicial system’s failure to criminally investigate and prosecute these lethal poisonings.
Public welcome, children friendly.

In the last four years, opioid-related deaths have spiked by nearly 500% across Chicago, according to the Chicago Tribune’s review of Cook County medical examiner records. Since 2014, the Cook County medical examiner’s office identified 3,097 opioid-related deaths in Chicago.

*Consider bringing an poster of your loved one lost sharing their name, age, date of death, drug toxicity and city in which the homicide occurred.

To effectively address this national crisis, we need state, local & federal commitment directed towards prevention, education, treatment, enforcement, and prosecution. Identifying the source of the lethal poisoning sends a clear and unmistakable message to drug dealers.
If you choose to profit from the misery and suffering of others, the judicial system will pursue you, and should the unthinkable tragedy of a fatal drug toxicity death occur because of your unlawful delivery, expect a knock on your door with an arrest warrant for drug-induced homicide.

Drug Induced Homicide arrests help tackle our city’s most serious drug threat – fentanyl.

When a person dies following a suspected drug toxicity death, it leaves an evidence trail; law enforcement must work with the evidence and the timeline in determining the source of the lethal dose.

“The charge of drug-induced homicide is designed to hold people criminally responsible for being in the chain of delivery, he said. That can mean buying the drugs, administering the dose, handing someone drugs, driving the car to go get the drugs — it can be “a lot of different things,” said Kane County State’s Attorney

It is undeniable that exceptional police work and law enforcement’s commitment to painstakingly investigating every overdose death in this county has been impactful. Drug-induced homicide is a serious, Class X offense that can be used to target and imprison dealers for at least six years and up to 30 years if the drugs they distribute, namely fentanyl and heroin, cause death.

Since late 2017, the McHenry County State’s Attorney’s Office has charged more than 40 dealers with drug-induced homicide, more than any other county in Illinois by far. Many counties, most notably Cook, rarely investigate or prosecute this charge, perhaps accepting the conventional reasoning that it would not be worthwhile because a user’s voluntary ingestion of drugs removes any allocation of responsibility to the dealer. McHenry County’s overdose statistics prove otherwise and bear witness to how faithful use of this charge can reduce supply, use, and mortality. Source: www.nwherald.com/2020/01/14/kenneally-overdose-deaths-drop-in-mchenry-county-host-of-factors-create-reduction/afz0krz/

A person commits drug-induced homicide when he or she unlawfully delivers a controlled substance to another, and any person’s death is caused by the injection, inhalation, absorption, or ingestion of any amount of that controlled substance. Drug-induced homicide is a Class X felony.

Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson admits
law enforcement decided against investigating drug-induced deaths a few years ago. “It’s becoming an epidemic, so we need to do what we can to reduce that,” Johnson said. Chicago police plan to create a task force to start handling the cases. “I’m confident we’ll be able to model what they have out in McHenry County,” Johnson said. “Our children, their lives matter too, and these cases must be investigated criminally.”

“The charge of drug-induced homicide is designed to hold people criminally responsible for being in the chain of delivery, he said. That can mean buying the drugs, administering the dose, handing someone drugs, driving the car to go get the drugs — it can be “a lot of different things,” said Kane County State’s Attorney Joe McMahon
When a person dies following a suspected drug toxicity death, it leaves an evidence trail; law enforcement must work with the evidence and the timeline in determining the source of the lethal dose.